News

Taylor Family Free Day on August 7, 2016

Hard work equals great rewards for Louisiana’s best high school students who can enjoy free admission along with their families to Audubon Nature Institute attractions and the New Orleans Museum of Art on Taylor Family Free Day, Sunday, August 7.

For two decades, Audubon Nature Institute has partnered with the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation and the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) to recognize students’ exceptional accomplishments in the classroom.

Phyllis M. Taylor, Chairman and President of the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation, announced recently that the Taylor Scholars Award Program has achieved a growth of about 5 percent in the 2015/2016 academic year, rewarding nearly 205,000 students – an increase of about 8,400 students over the prior year – by providing them with free one-year memberships to New Orleans Museum of Art, Audubon Zoo, Audubon Aquarium of the Americas and Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium.

Taylor Family Free Day offers an additional reward for Taylor/Audubon students and scholars, who can invite parents or guardians and two family members or friends to visit free on this special day (a total of four free admissions in addition to the Taylor Student/Scholar.) The special day also features discounts for qualified students and their guests at NOMA and Audubon gift shops and a discount at Entergy Giant Screen Theater at the Aquarium. At Audubon Zoo, discounts also are available for the Cool Zoo water park and Gator Run, Carousel and Swamp Train.

At a recent luncheon with a small group of Taylor scholars, Mrs. Taylor said inspiration for the program was “quite simple.” “The question was how do we motivate young people to be participants,” Mrs. Taylor said. “And what a better opportunity than to give them a chance – if they do the right courses and make the right grades in school – to give them a reward, a recognition. And you can’t beat a chance to come to the Audubon Zoo or the Aquarium.”

Mrs. Taylor said participation has exceeded her expectations. “Never did we believe that our program would reach and go to the extent as it has. It shows you the desire and the hunger that children – young adults I should really call them – to better themselves to learn what is happening in the world and to make a difference.”

Asked if she had any advice for program participants, Mrs. Taylor said: “Just keep doing what you’re doing because your future and our future is in your hands.”

The Patrick F. Taylor Foundation has dedicated $900,000 to an endowment for the Taylor/Audubon Students and Scholars Program, allowing it to continue in perpetuity. Eligible students earn a one-year membership to the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas and the Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium for achieving a minimum 2.5 grade point average. Students who earn a grade point average of 3.0 or above also qualify for an additional one-year membership to Audubon Zoo.

“Audubon attractions are the best places for young people to learn about the wonders of nature,” said Audubon Nature Institute President and CEO Ron Forman. “We can’t wait to open our doors to Louisiana’s brightest high school students and their families on August 7.”

The Taylor Scholars Awards Program is open to all Louisiana students in grades 7 through 12 whether they attend public, private or parochial schools. Parents or guardians may accompany qualifying students free of charge throughout the year.

The Taylor/Audubon Students and Scholars Program was created in 1996 through a generous gift from the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation. The program was the first of its kind in the nation. In 1997, it was followed with the creation of the Taylor/NOMA Scholars Program through a separate endowment from the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation.

“As an art museum, we have the opportunity to engage young adults and expose them to new experiences and inspire learning through the arts,” said Susan Taylor, director of the New Orleans Museum of Art.

“With the support of the foundation, NOMA has the ability to create a fresh and exciting way for Taylor Scholars to open themselves up to art, language, history and culture. We are honored to be a part of the Taylor Scholars program and we look forward to hosting Taylor Scholars with their families on August 7.”

Nicholas Albert, a Taylor Scholar and Lusher Charter School graduate who will be attending Harvard University in the fall, said the program has been an inspiration for him. “It gave me a chance to really work hard and I integrated that into my character,” Albert said.

“Just the whole working hard and reaching my goals and there’s always a reward at the end. That’s something I will carry with me when I start college next year.”   Claudia Rodriguez, an Ursuline Academy graduate headed to LSU, called the program “a really nice reward for all our hard work throughout the year.  “The biggest takeaway is to just never settle for the bare minimum, just go the extra mile and really chase your dream,” Rodriguez said.

On Sunday, August 7, Taylor Scholars are asked to check in at membership windows at Audubon attractions and NOMA with their Taylor Card and to bring a photo ID. If a Taylor Card is reported lost, students must bring their most recent report card and a photo ID to request a new Taylor award certificate.

Continue Reading

Taylor Scholars Family Day is Nov. 28

On Taylor Family Day at the New Orleans Museum of Art, Taylor students and scholars may bring their parents or guardians plus two family members or friends for free to enjoy a a fun-filled day at the museum.

Schedule of Events:

11 am – 5 pm: Educator Appreciation Day. All day, educators are welcomed to NOMA and will receive free admission
11 am – 5 pm: Images of Excellence scavenger hunt. Focused on a teen audience, but appropriate for visitors of all ages, this scavenger hunt will encourage students and their families to explore the museum’s collection, with a focus on the theme of excellence
11 am – 5 pm: Intervals of piano music in the Great Hall
11:30 am: StoryQuest with The NOLA Project. Actors from award-winning, local theater company, The NOLA Project, will read children’s books on the theme of Space. After the reading, families are encouraged to explore the galleries using their Quest Cards
12 noon – 4 pm: Art on the Spot will feature a teaching artist from Young Audiences. This hands-on art activity is for visitors of all ages and skill levels.
1 – 4 pm: Drawings each hour for prizes and gifts from the NOMA Shop for Taylor Scholars
2 pm: New Orleans Dance Academy Nutcracker performance in the Great Hall

About the Taylor Scholars Program:

The Taylor/Audubon/NOMA Students and Scholars Program rewards Louisiana’s top students in grades 7th through 12th grades who have qualified for the Taylor Scholars Award Program with hands-on educational outings that will create memories for a lifetime. Eligible students earn a one-year membership to Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium, and the New Orleans Museum of Art for achieving a minimum 2.5 grade point average. Students who earn a grade point average of 3.0 or above also qualify for a one-year membership to those institutions, as well as Audubon Zoo.

Continue Reading

Patrick F. Taylor Foundation Object Project Opens at Smithsonian

By: Smithsonian National Museum of American History

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History opened a unique hands-on learning space, the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation Object Project, on July 1. Made possible by philanthropist Phyllis Taylor, the 4,000-square-foot space in the museum’s new Innovation Wing focuses on “everyday things that changed everything.”

Anchored by an array of individual cases—some overhead, others with visitor-activated sound,light and motion effects—“Object Project” invites visitors to interact with approximately 250 objects within the 9-by-40-foot sculpture that forms the learning space. The space is divided into four sections: Bicycles, Refrigerators, Ready-to-Wear Clothes and Household Hits, which includes a customized interactive version of “The Price Is Right” game show format licensed from FremantleMedia North America Inc.

“‘Object Project’ puts history into the hands of our visitors, helping them learn about the history of innovation and allowing them to discover connections between innovative ideas and society’s needs,” said the museum’s MacMillan Associate Director for Education and Public Engagement, Judy Gradwohl.

Glass-fronted cases hold a variety of common objects with unexpected stories, including a Columbia bicycle customized by Tiffany & Co. in 1896; a pop-up toaster from the 1920s; a shopping cart from 1937; dishes designed for leftovers and toys, such as a 1950s Pretty Maid toy kitchen and celebrity paper dolls. Hands-on carts feature activities that explore when ice cubes were a novelty and hats were commonplace.

“Object Project” invites visitors to use fun and surprising activities and games to uncover intriguing stories behind many objects taken for granted today. Visitors can sit atop two representative 1880s high-wheel bicycles and pose for photos. A “magic” scrapbook uses overhead projections to fill its pages with photographs and clippings that materialize and swoop into place on the page.

Digital resources include a website and a blog with behind-the-scenes glance into research, object acquisition and space development. An illustrated online essay by author and object expert Rob Walker explores how Americans have been venturesome in their adoption and adaptation of innovative things.

The National Museum of American History is at 14th Street and Constitution Avenue N.W. and open daily from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (closed Dec. 25). Admission is free.

Continue Reading

Phyllis Taylor Announces $1,000,000 Patrick F. Taylor Foundation Gift to Support the Louisiana Children’s Museum’s Early Learning Village Campaign

Phyllis Taylor has announced a $1,000,000 gift from the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation to support the Louisiana Children’s Museum’s Early Learning Village Campaign.  The announcement was made at a rare gathering of the Museum’s founding board members and current leadership, and on the heels of the Louisiana Children’s Museum receiving the 2015 National Medal for Museum and Library Service – the nation’s highest honor given to museums and libraries for service to the community.

“When the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation started its efforts in education, it was focused almost entirely at the university level.  As we continued that effort, particularly working to see that the TOPS opportunity continues to be available, we have come to realize the great need for early childhood development,” said Phyllis Taylor.

“The decision to support the Louisiana Children’s Museum’s Early Learning Village Campaign was an easy one. This is a unique concept that brings many aspects of early childhood development together under one umbrella, providing assistance to adults, parents and teachers to expand its impact,” added Taylor.

The Louisiana Children’s Museum’s Early Learning Village campus will be located in New Orleans City Park and serve as a social, cultural and learning resource for young children from birth to age eight and their families.  The project will include the unprecedented collaboration of multiple children’s organizations coming together in a single location in support of children, families and early childhood educators throughout the region.

“For nearly three decades, the Louisiana Children’s Museum has unleashed the potential of millions of children through interactive, play-based learning experiences,” said Julia Bland, Chief Executive Officer of the Louisiana Children’s Museum. “The Patrick F. Taylor Foundation gift is an investment in future and well-being of children and families throughout the region and additionally serves as affirmation of our vision from the region’s premier supporter of educational opportunities for Louisiana’s children and youth.

At its future location in City Park, the Louisiana Children’s Museum will feature interactive exhibit galleries as well as indoor and outdoor educational programs that weave experiences in STEM, literacy, health and wellness, arts and culture, and environmental education.  The 8.5 acre site will also host a literacy and documentation center, parent and teacher resource center, nature center, and an edible garden, kitchen and café, among other features.

The Louisiana Children’s Museum project is on schedule to open in 2018 in time for the celebration of the 300th birthday of the City of New Orleans.

Continue Reading

Taylor Family Fun Fest

Phyllis M. Taylor, Chairman and President of the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation, announced this week that the Taylor Scholars Awards program has achieved a growth of 10 percent in the 2014/2015 academic year, rewarding more than 195,000 students through April by providing them with free one-year memberships to the New Orleans Museum of Art, Audubon Zoo, Audubon Aquarium of the Americas and Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium.

Mrs. Taylor joined representatives of Audubon Nature Institute and the New Orleans Museum of Art in expressing pride that the Taylor Scholars Program continues to expand its reach after nearly two decades. Eligible students earn a one-year membership to NOMA and Audubon attractions for achieving a minimum 2.5 grade point average.

The Taylor/Audubon Students and Scholars program was created in 1996 through a generous gift from the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation to establish in perpetuity, a reward to Louisiana’s students for their hard work in the classroom. This program was the first of its kind in the nation. In 1997, it was followed with the creation of the Taylor/NOMA Scholars program through an endowment from the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation.

Saturday, May 16, 2015, is the official Taylor Family Fun Fest at Audubon Zoo, which will feature music from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., free entrance to the Dino Exhibit and discounts on Audubon concessions and gift shop items for qualifying student and their guests.

Taylor scholars are asked to check in at membership windows with your Taylor Card and be sure to bring a photo ID. Taylor students and scholars may bring their parents or guardians plus two family members or friends for free that day as they visit the Zoo, Audubon Aquarium of the Americas or Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium.

If a Taylor Card is reported lost, students must bring their third quarter report card with a photo ID to request a new Taylor award certificate. For more information, go to http://www.auduboninstitute.org/taylor-day

Continue Reading

Anti-Defamation League names Phyllis Taylor as A.I. Botnick Torch of Liberty Award Winner

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) has chosen Phyllis Taylor and Dr. Nick Mueller as this year’s A.I. Botnick Torch of Liberty Award Winners. Mrs. Taylor and Dr. Mueller embody the award’s prestige and philanthropic commitment to the community. “Award recipients are people who care not just for themselves today, but for the children and grandchildren of tomorrow,” says Nancy B. Timm, ADL South-Central Regional Board Chair, “who care enough to translate caring into action, who strive to build a future in which every citizen will share the fruits of democracy.”

Phyllis Taylor is a leader in philanthropic engagement in New Orleans and has been an ardent supporter of education initiatives that have been transformational to the city and state’s educational landscape. With her late husband, Patrick F. Taylor—an ADL Torch of Liberty Honoree from 1989—Phyllis Taylor has worked to see the continuance of the Taylor Opportunity Program for Students, an innovative program that provides access to college for all high school graduates of Louisiana that meet the certain core curriculum standards.  Taylor is chairwoman of Endeavor Enterprises L.L.C. and Taylor Energy Company LLC. She also chairs the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation, which has benefited numerous education, public safety, and humanitarian efforts across the Greater New Orleans area since 1985. Taylor is an important role model for the business community, and her voice in education is key to a city like New Orleans that is touted nationally as a laboratory for education reform.

Dr. Nick Mueller has achieved a remarkable impact in his role as President and CEO of The National World War II Museum, an institution that is facing a $325 million expansion as it secures a place among the world’s top museums. The museum sees millions of visitors and has been ranked by TripAdvisor as the #1 attraction in New Orleans, the #4 museum in the nation, and the #11 museum worldwide. In addition to its exciting permanent exhibitions and innovative education programs, the museum teaches about the meaning of the war effort in defending individual rights and democratic institutions, and will explore these themes in the coming Liberation Pavilion. The museum has long hosted ADL’s Echoes and Reflections program, a Holocaust curriculum for educators. Dr. Mueller enjoyed a 33-year career as a professor of history and administrator at the University of New Orleans prior to his work at the museum, and now devotes his academic leadership skills to advancing the public good.

“Mrs. Taylor and Dr. Mueller are truly inspirational individuals,” says Dr. Allison Padilla-Goodman, ADL South-Central Regional Director. “They are leaders in defining the future of New Orleans and have made immense contributions to defining our educational landscape.”

The award will be presented at the annual A.I. Botnick Torch of Liberty Award Dinner at the Hyatt Regency of New Orleans onDecember 1, 2015. Tickets are available by contacting the local ADL office at new-orleans@adl.org or 504-780-5602.

 

The Anti-Defamation League, founded in 1913, is the world’s leading organization fighting anti-Semitism through programs and services that counteract hatred, prejudice and bigotry.

Continue Reading

Kingsley House’s new Patrick F. Taylor Campus to be finished in 2016

By Jeff Adelson, The Advocate

The largest expansion of Kingsley House since it moved to its Constance Street location almost a century ago was celebrated by philanthropists and officials Thursday as they broke ground on the Lower Garden District social service agency’s new building.

The 24,000-square-foot building is expected to be completed in about a year. It will be named for Patrick F. Taylor, the New Orleans oil magnate and philanthropist who pushed for the agency’s expansion before his death in 2004 and whose foundation was a significant donor to the new campus.

“This will get more children off the waiting lists and into a phenomenal facility designed specifically to meet their growth and development needs,” said Keith Liederman, CEO of Kingsley House. “And it will allow more medically fragile adults and senior citizens to live in their own homes and communities as long as possible.”

The building will be evenly divided between classrooms for about 100 children and space for its Adult Health Care and Senior Center program, which will serve a similar number of adults.

“This brings together some of the youngest members of our city with some of the oldest members of our city,” state Rep. Walt Leger III, D-New Orleans, said at the groundbreaking. “I have no doubt generations of New Orleanians will benefit from this project.”

The campus will be built with $6 million in state money, $2 million in a partially forgivable loan from the state’s Office of Community Development, $1.7 million in private donations and $1.6 million from a transaction involving New Market Tax Credits that is being handled by the Low Income Investment Fund and Chase Bank.

The organization is launching another campaign to raise $2 million to pay off the loan, with the goal of settling that debt by the time the new campus opens its doors.

Kingsley House, founded in 1896, provides a variety of services to about 7,000 children, seniors and medically disabled adults. Those include Head Start and Early Head Start, the Educare New Orleans early childhood education program, and programs and services for adults and seniors on the campus or in their homes.

The project has been in the works for 15 years, since Taylor began working to ensure that Kingsley House would be able to expand onto the vacant lot next to its campus. That included convincing the Orleans Parish School Board, which owned the property, to enter into an agreement that would allow Kingsley House to build on it.

With that done, the project seemed ready to go until Hurricane Katrina hit the area, upending those plans and requiring the nonprofit to seek more sources of funding. Phyllis Taylor, Patrick Taylor’s widow, praised the tenacity of the Kingsley House board and officials for pushing through those challenges.

“For 15 years, we’ve been saying the funding is here and, oops, it’s gone,” she said.

“The youth of this city and the elderly need the best care possible, and that’s what they will certainly get at Kingsley House,” she said.

View the original article here:  http://theadvocate.com/news/neworleans/neworleansnews/12008883-123/kingsley-house-expansion-to-serve

Continue Reading

Taylor Foundation Gives $920K to Louisiana Tech

– Funds will support scholarships for first generation and outstanding students –

The Board of Trustees of the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation have presented Louisiana Tech University with a gift of $920,000 to fund scholarships for first generation and academically outstanding students.

Continue Reading

Taylor Foundation Celebrates 30 Years

2015 marks the 30 year anniversary of the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation. The Taylors started the Foundation in 1985 as a gesture of thanks to the nation that had given them so much. Although best known for its work in education through the promotion of the Taylor Plan, the Foundation also supports law enforcement, the military, and other community and humanitarian efforts. Since its founding, the Foundation’s total gifts and commitments in these areas total more than $53 million to more than 475 organizations in Louisiana and across the United States.

Continue Reading

Toys for Tots Tradition

The Taylors have been involved with the U. S. Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program for more than 30 years, and this past holiday season was no different.

Continue Reading